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Open A.I.R. in Ethiopia

In Ethiopia, Open A.I.R. is represented by Wondwossen Belete and Seble Baraki. Belete's case study is investigating the IP dynamics of university-industry partnerships in Ethiopia, while Baraki is providing support to a case study examining place-based intellectual property (PBIP) opportunities for Ethiopian coffee. Baraki is also an Open A.I.R. Research Fellow, and is currently working out of the project's Southern Africa Hub at the University of Cape Town's IP Law and Policy Research Unit.

Ethiopia Team

12th Globelics International Conference

The 12th Globelics International Conference, convened by Addis Ababa University and the Globelics Secretariat at Aalborg University, Denmark, is focusing on research into innovation and development in the globalised context -- via a mix of  research paper presentations, panel discussions and plenary speeches. This year’s keynote speeches are by Martin Bell (2014 Freeman Lecture) and Jorge Katz (2014 Globelics Lecture).

Open A.I.R. research is being presented at the conference by Prof. Chidi Oguamanam, Prof. Jeremy de Beer, Dr. Tobias Schonwetter and Nan Warner.

Type of event: 
Conference
Date: 
Wed, 29/10/2014 to Fri, 31/10/2014
Place: 
Addis Ababa

Open A.I.R. Side Event: During Meeting of WIPO Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP/13)

Open A.I.R. presented its research findings — on knowledge, innovation and intellectual property (IP) in Africa — to delegates attending the 13th Session (19 to 23 May 2014) of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP/13) in Geneva. On Thursday 22 May at WIPO Headquarters, Open A.I.R. network members Prof. Jeremy de Beer and Dr. Dick Kawooya convened a CDIP/13 side event, entitled "Knowledge, Innovation and Intellectual Property in Africa: From Current Realities to Future Scenarios," to outline the contents of Open A.I.R.'s two recent research publications (see flyer below): Innovation and Intellectual Property: Collaborative Dynamics in Africa (UCT Press, 2013), and Knowledge and Innovation in Africa: Scenarios for the Future (Open A.I.R., 2013). Also speaking at the event were Herman Ntchatcho, Senior Director for Africa and Special Projects in WIPO's Special Projects Division; and Ahmed Abdel Latif, Senior Programme Manager for Innovation, Technology and Intellectual Property at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD).

 

Type of event: 
Seminar
Date: 
Thu, 22/05/2014
Place: 
Geneva

Open A.I.R. Workshop

Open A.I.R. network members convened in Ottawa, Canada, for a three-day workshop to engage with:

  • activities at the Open A.I.R. Hub institutions
  • Open A.I.R. case study and comparative review findings
  • Open A.I.R. Fellowship activities
  • Open A.I.R. publication outputs, dissemination strategies and approaches to policy engagement
  • IDRC programmes and initiatives dealing with IP matters, and links to Open A.I.R. work and objectives
  • a future phase for the Open A.I.R. network beyond mid-2014
  • recent Canadian Supreme Court rulings on copyright matters
  • Open A.I.R.’s Scenarios for the Future compendium
Type of event: 
Workshop/Meeting
Date: 
Thu, 03/10/2013 to Sat, 05/10/2013
Place: 
Ottawa

AAAML Congress on Geographical Indications (GIs) and Trademarks

Open A.I.R. Ethiopia team member and Research Fellow Seble Baraki is attending this AAAML Congress on the status of geographical indication (GI) and trademark protection of European agricultural products, foodstuffs, wines and spirits. One of Baraki's current research areas is the application of GI systemes in her home country Ethiopia.

Type of event: 
Conference
Date: 
Fri, 15/03/2013 to Sat, 16/03/2013
Place: 
Parma, Italy

Global Congress -- Session on IP, Innovation and Development

On 16 December 2012, Day 2 of the second Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest, Open A.I.R.’s Dr. Tobias Schonwetter and ICTSD’s Ahmed Abdel Latif co-chaired a session on "IP, Innovation and Development". The Open A.I.R. Project was used as the starting point for the first part of the discussions, with Open A.I.R. researchers Dr. Caroline Ncube, Prof. Nagla Rizk and Dr. Tesh Dagne discussing some of their preliminary case study findings. Subsequently, Open A.I.R. Research Fellows Seble Baraki (Ethiopia), Helen Chuma-Okoro (Nigeria), Eliamani Laltaika (Tanzania) and Esther Ngom (Cameroon) shared with the audience some of their experiences from their Fellowship placements in Cape Town.

The session’s primary goal was to identify priority research areas and forums. It was noted that the Open A.I.R. Project already speaks to a large number of topical IP-related issues; however, the Global Congress session identified the following as priority research areas and fora:

  1. the use of geographical indication (GI) protection in Africa
  1. implications of Bayh-Dole like legislation, such as the recent IPR from Publicly Financed Research and Development Act in South Africa;
  1. evaluation of WIPO’s development-agenda work; and
  1. food security and plant variety protection laws.

And the session participants agreed that the following needed to be taken into account when doing research on the aforementioned topics:  

  • while global questions need to be asked, regional answers or debates are required, and a greater reflection on and representation of issues of the Global South are necessary;
  • research should be inter-disciplinary as IP law/policy is only one element of the innovation system;
  • researchers from least developed countries (LDCs) should be involved when there is research on the Global South (most research in developing countries is still carried out by researchers in non-LDC emerging market countries such as India, Brazil and South Africa); and
  • research should be linked to capacity-building activities and should take into account sustainability considerations.

The session identified regional and multilateral organisations such as WIPO, WTO, ARIPO and OAPI as priority forums, and the participants committed to the following activities for the upcoming year:

  • (based on Open A.I.R. findings) publish working papers, develop policy and business briefs, and conduct outreach seminars to engage with stakeholders; and
  • improve the sharing of our research and data from development-focussed IP research.
Type of event: 
Conference
Date: 
Sun, 16/12/2012
Place: 
Rio de Janeiro

Strategies for IP from Publicly Funded Research

Open A.I.R.'s Ethiopia Team, seeking to ensure that its research work is made known to a wide range of science, technology and innovation (STI) stakeholders, joined forces for this workshop with the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) and the Ethiopia Chapter of the African Technology Policy Studies (ATPS) Network. Open A.I.R., UNECA and ATPS-Ethiopia jointly convened the workshop, from 3 to 6 December in Addis Ababa, and it was attended by Open A.I.R. researchers, university technology transfer officers, private-sector innovation stakeholders (including small-scale entrepreneurs), UNECA representatives and ATPS representatives.The workshop focussed on how African government-funded innovation/STI systems, including IP policies, can be designed in such a way that they optimise the developmental value of public investments in university/tertiary research.Four Open A.I.R. research case studies – in Botswana, South Africa, Uganda and Ethiopia – are examining the dynamics of IP generated by publicly funded research. Among other things, the studies are looking at the degree to which developed-world approaches to commercialisation of IP from public research – as typified by the US Bayh-Dole Act, which prioritises patenting – are appropriate to African innovation.The photo below shows Open A.I.R. Ethiopia's Wondwossen Belete, far right, addressing the workshop, with Open A.I.R. Botswana researcher Prof. Njoku Ama (far left) and Open A.I.R. South Africa's Dr. Caroline Ncube (third from left) in attendance. 

Type of event: 
Workshop/Meeting
Date: 
Mon, 03/12/2012 to Thu, 06/12/2012
Place: 
Addis Ababa

African Technology Policy Studies Network (ATPS) Conference

The ATPS 2012 Annual Conference, whose theme is Emerging Paradigms, Technologies and Innovations for Sustainable Development: Global Imperatives and African Realities”, ill be held from 18 to 24 November in Addis Ababa.
    
Papers are invited from prospective presenters under the following sub-themes:

  • Transitions to Low Carbon Development Pathways: Implications for Sustainable Development in Africa
  • Governance of Science, Technologies and Innovation including Genetics for Farming, Biotechnologies, Nanotechnologies and Indigenous Knowledge Systems
  • Institutional Structures and Social Innovations for Sustainable Development in Africa
  • Youth and Gender Empowerment for Sustainable Development in Africa
  • Mainstreaming Transdisciplinarity in STI in Higher Education

 For details on registration and paper submission, visit the conference page at http://www.atpsnet.org/conferences/index.php
 To register for the conference, visit  http://www.atpsnet.org/about/conferences/index.php

Type of event: 
Conference
Date: 
Sun, 18/11/2012 to Sat, 24/11/2012
Place: 
Addis Ababa

Protecting African Bio-cultural Heritage: The Role of Intellectual Property Rights

Three Open A.I.R. Research Fellows will present at a seminar, hosted by the University of Cape Town's (UCT's) All Africa House, entitled “Protecting African Bio-cultural Heritage: The Role of Intellectual Property Rights”. Open A.I.R. Research Fellow Eliamani Laltaika of Tanzania will present on the topic of “Intellectual Property Rights: A Part of the Problem?” while Fellow Esther Ngom of Cameroon will speak on “Protecting African Traditional Medicinal Knowledge: Which Way Africa?” Third presentation, by Fellow Seble Baraki of Ethiopia, will be on “Geographical Indications: Law a New Tool of Trade for Africa?"

Type of event: 
Seminar
Date: 
Tue, 28/08/2012
Place: 
Cape Town

IP and university-industry linkages in Ethiopia

What kind of IP policy framework is likely to best promote effective university-industry linkages in Ethiopia, taking account of the specific circumstances of the country? The role of IP in the transfer of knowledge from universities to industry has recently become an area of strong policy interest in developing countries. With the objective of promoting innovation-based economic growth as well as national competitiveness, some developing countries have passed laws promoting the commercialisation, via patenting, of results of publicly funded research by universities. In Ethiopia, the Green Paper on Science, Technology and Innovation policy identifies management of IP rights at institutional levels as one of the strategies for building a development-oriented IP regime in the country. The emphasis of Ethiopian policy in this area is on emulation of the policies adopted in developed countries, such as the US Bayh-Dole Act, which prioritise IP commercialisation. This study examines the current status of IP generated from publicly funded research in Ethiopian universities and seeks to understand which kind of IP policy framework would best promote university-industry partnership for the transfer of knowledge and technology. The study is based on the assumption that Ethiopian policies on IP from publicly funded research need to be appropriate to the Ethiopian context.

Geographical indications (GIs) and open development in Ethiopia and Ghana

How might geographical indication (GI) strategies facilitate collaboration and openness for developmental purposes? Place-based intellectual property (PBIP) mechanisms range from sui generis geographical indication (GI) protections, to various forms of specialty trademarks, to different types of regulatory schemes. Based on case studies of existing initiatives in production and marketing of Ethiopian coffee and Ghanaian cocoa, this research aims to explore how and to what extent GIs might allow local agricultural producers to collaboratively control their knowledge-based products in a manner that better facilitates their participation in the globalised economy.
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